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Information Resources 

   

Effective today (July 23, 2020) Mayor Bowser has officially extended the Public Health Emergency to October 9th, 2020. 

Click here to read Mayor’s Order 2020-079 Extension of the Public Emergency. 

 

Mayor Bowser also signed a new order on masks: Order 2020-080 Wearing of Masks in the District of Columbia To Prevent the Spread of COVID-19.

 

The order on masks “consolidates, clarifies, and extends requirements related to wearing masks indoors and outdoors in the District of Columbia and provides enforcement mechanisms for these requirements."

The order requires the following:

  • “Persons must wear a mask in the common areas of apartments, condominiums and cooperatives”
  • Anyone leaving their residence must wear a mask when likely to come within six feet of another person “for more than a fleeting time”
  • Anyone driving or riding in a taxi or other form of public transportation must wear a mask.
  • Businesses/office buildings/establishments open to the public must post signage on exterior doors stating “a person may not enter unless the person is wearing a mask” and anyone who tries to enter without a mask or removes their mask will be ejected.
  • “Employers shall provide masks to their employees.”

Exceptions: The following are exceptions the requirement to wear a mask:

  • You are a resident/guest in a private dwelling
  • When eating, drinking, smoking
  • No mask required if someone can’t wear a mask because of a medical condition or disability, or someone is physically unable to remove a mask.
  • No mask required if “a deaf or hard of hearing person needs to read the lips of a speaker.”
  • When exercising vigorously outdoors and social distancing (6 feet minimum)
  • When swimming
  • When you are in an enclosed office alone that no one else is allowed to enter.





It's Not Too Late - Fill Out Your Census Form Today! 



As of July 7th, the DC self-response rate is 58.1 %, the national rate is 61.1%.   Based on recent data, DC needs 1,200 households to complete the census EVERYDAY until July 31st just to reach our 2010 self-response rate of 66%.   Roughly 64,000 households in DC have not yet self-responded to the census--either online, by phone or by mail.

It's not too late to fill out your Census. It’ll take 10 minutes or less! If you misplaced your unique Census ID, use your address instead! Get counted by using one of the three easy options: 

Complete online at 2020census.gov
Complete by phone: 1-844-330-2020  
Complete by mail 
2020census.gov/responding-by-mail


A Message to Neighbors on GU’s 2020 Fall Semester Plan from the Community Members of the GCP Steering Committee

 
Georgetown University has released its plan for the Fall, 2020 semester (https://www.georgetown.edu/coronavirus/fall-2020/).  They are moving forward carefully, as conditions allow, to bring to campus approximately two thousand undergraduates a majority of whom will be members of the first-year class, the Class of 2024.


Flying In the Age of Covid-19




The evidence of how indoor spaces facilitate transmission keeps mounting. There are recent publications describing a COVID-19 outbreak cluster associated with a bus excursion where 23 out of 67 passengers became infected, a person's outing to a nightclub that led to at least 80 new cases, and a training workshop where 15 of 30 attendees all became ill. In addition to these studies, an important study published on Wednesday revealed findings that 1 minute of loud speaking could create at least 1,000 respiratory droplets that remain suspended in the air for up to 8 minutes. They estimated, but did not experimentally demonstrate, that these droplets may contain between 1,000-100,000 infectious viral particles.

 

Now that we have strong evidence demonstrating the ease with which this virus can be transmitted in enclosed spaces, we must start to evaluate our decisions to bring large numbers of people together, especially in stressful situations.

 

These new examples and the science that is supporting transmission via respiratory emissions must make us pause and carefully consider our individual decisions about where we go and how long we spend in public locations, to the extent that our lives and employment situations allow us to choose where we spend our days.

 

Key things to take with you:

·         Small hand sanitizers that would get through TSA screening.

Disinfecting wipes. Take disinfecting wipes and put them in a clear Ziploc bag.

 


In the Airport:

Don't touch surfaces.

If you do touch something sanitize your hands.

Don't touch your face and keep your mask on at all times.

Play it overly cautious, keep an appropriate physical distance from people to avoid getting crowded in check points.

 

This is important: It is our interactions with people that lead to transmission chains. The more interactions, the greater the chance of either infection or transmission. While in the airport, (if you can) have a single person for all person-to-person interactions with airport staff or shops.


On the plane
:

Stop touching surfaces! Wipe down every single surface you touch. Armrest. Table. Monitor etc.


But It's An Enclosed Space!

 A plane is a seriously enclosed space, with little air volume, and you are there for an extended period. It appears to have all of the parameters needed for outbreak calamity. But there is a big difference with planes compared to other enclosed spaces because planes have substantial air-filtration and air-exchange.

 
On modern Boeing planes (others may be the same), the entire air volume of the cabin is exchanged with outside air every 4 to 5 minutes (12 to 15 cabin air exchanges per hour). Additionally, the cabin air is filtered through a HEPA filtration system 25-30 times per hour.

As a point of reference:

HEPA Filters: are required to capture 99.97% of all particles >0.3 micrometers.

N95 respirators: are required to capture 95% of all particles >0.3 micrometers

 

 So the HEPA filters in a plane have a higher filtering capacity than the N95 masks doctors and nurses are wearing when they are caring for COVID-19 patients. Granted, the respirators filter 100% of inhaled air, but the point is, aircraft have a substantial air filtration capacity.


The design of the air filtration systems on planes divides the planes up into zones of about 5-7 rows per zone. The bigger the plane, the more zones. Basically, the plane is divided up into air compartments so the emissions from someone 10 rows behind you is going to have little effect on you due to the zoning, filtration, and air exchange.

The little air nozzle above your head shoots our air directly from the HEPA filter. Directing that airstream on you increases the amount of HEPA-purified air you are inhaling. Turn it on!

 

Note: Aircraft air starts to deteriorate when you are on the ground. Wait to get on the plane, and don't linger getting off the plane.



 Mayor Muriel Bowser announced the District of Columbia will
enter into Phase Two of reopening on Monday, June 22nd.  

Please click the links below for more information on the mayor's reopening orders.  

Phase Two Reopening Order

Mayor's Order: Phase Two of Washington, DC Reopening

                                                                                                       Phase One Reopening Order

 

Mayor's Order: Phase One of Washington, DC Reopening








Click the link below to read more about Face Masks & Physical Distancing Reduce COVID-19 Risk https://www.statista.com/chart/21882/chance-of-covid-19-transmission/


 Coronavirus (COVID-19): Guidance for Older Adults


Older adults (adults over age 60) might be at higher risk for developing more serious
complications from COVID-19, as well as being at higher risk of death due to COVID-19. This
guidance provides steps to take to reduce your risk of becoming infected with COVID-19.

The best way to prevent COVID-19 is to avoid being exposed to this virus. Here are some
actions you can take now to reduce your risk of getting sick:

• Stay at home and avoid close contact with other people, if possible.

• Keep away from people who are sick.

• Wear a cloth face covering or facemask at all times if you need to go out in public.

• Keep space between yourself and others (stay 6 feet away, which is about two arm
lengths).

• Clean your hands often with soap and water or hand sanitizer, especially before
preparing or eating food, before and after using the toilet, and after blowing your nose,
sneezing, or coughing.

• Do not delay getting care of any underlying condition because of COVID-19.

• Call your healthcare provider if you have concerns about your medical conditions or if
you get sick and think you may have COVID-19. If you need emergency help, call 911.

The recommendations will continue to be updated as we learn more about COVID-19.

Please visit https://coronavirus.dc.gov/ for the most current information.



Georgetown University Implements New Campus Face Covering Requirement

 

 

In response to the continuing COVID-19 pandemic, the university is implementing new guidance requiring all employees, students and visitors to wear a face covering when on any of the university’s DC campuses beginning immediately and effective until further notice.

This guidance is in accordance with the May 13, 2020, District of Columbia Mayor’s Extensions of Public Emergency and Public Health Emergency and Preparation for Washington, DC Reopening Order 2020-066 which mandates face coverings for individuals where social distance cannot be maintained.

As detailed in the guidance, all employees, students, and visitors over the age of two are required to wear a face covering at all times, except when alone in a private room with a closed door or in a private vehicle. This guidance also applies to all riders of university GUTS buses.

Any employee, student or visitor who fails to abide by these guidelines may be asked or directed to leave campus.

As a reminder, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores and pharmacies), especially in areas of significant community-based transmission.

For more information about the university’s face covering guidance as well as additional health information,answers to frequently asked questions and other university resources on the Georgetown Coronavirus (COVID-19) Resource Center.





 


Mayor Bowser Presents a Comprehensive Plan Proposal 
That Will Guide DC Through Coronavirus Recovery


 Mayor Muriel Bowser submitted the District’s Comprehensive Plan proposal to the Council of the District of Columbia. This update to the Comprehensive Plan will allow the District to meet long-term challenges and opportunities in critical areas such as housing, economic vibrancy, environment, and access to public resources – and to do so with a focus on equity and resilience. The Comprehensive Plan presents a suite of tools and approaches that can be immediately applied in the response to the economic, social, and public health impacts caused by the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The Council’s timely consideration and passage of this bill is critical.

“An updated Comprehensive Plan is even more critical now, given the current disruptions that the COVID-19 pandemic is causing for the District’s residents and businesses,” said Mayor Bowser. “As we move from response to reopening and recovery, this Comprehensive Plan will serve as an essential guide to ensure that the District not only recovers, but emerges stronger, healthier, more resilient, and more equitable than ever.”

The Comprehensive Plan proposal emphasizes the importance of equity and resilience as the District works to meet current and future housing and infrastructure needs as well as other challenges. The long-term vision of the District contained in this amendment will serve as an important guide in the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.

“The update that we submitted today reflects the best analysis, policies and actions that will prepare DC to manage the change ahead with an eye toward equity, resilience and shared prosperity,” said Andrew Trueblood, Director of the DC Office of Planning. “We are committed to do what we can to support the adoption of this Comprehensive Plan in 2020, so that District residents will have the support we need to seize the opportunities and tackle the challenges ahead.”

The Comprehensive Plan proposal, which is the result of unprecedented outreach and coordination led by the Office of Planning (OP) over the last few years, was initially adopted in 2006 and last amended in 2011. The four major themes that are woven throughout the Comprehensive Plan update – resilience, equity, housing affordability, and public resources – were derived from community feedback. Public engagement began in 2016 with outreach and educational events throughout the city and an open call for proposed amendments in 2017, which generated over 3,000 proposals. OP conducted additional public engagement in 2019 that allowed both the public and ANCs to weigh in on the draft amendment.

For more information on the Comprehensive Plan proposal and amendment process, please visit plandc.dc.gov.



Basic Needs Assessment for DC Residents


The District has launched a Basic Needs Assessment for residents who are medically required to quarantine (either they or someone in their family has tested positive for COVID-19 or their medical provider has asked them to quarantine for related reasons). This assessment ensures eligible residents have the food, basic hygiene supplies, prescription medication, and mental health support needed to get through their quarantine. While this support is short-term, residents who appear to need longer-term assistance are also connected to other government agencies for follow up.


Simply call 1-888-349-8323 Monday-Friday from 7am-7pm or visit coronavirus.dc.gov/gethelp to fill out an assessment online

 



TRUSTED MEDICAL RESOURCES


DC Government Coronavirus Information:
https://coronavirus.dc.gov/

Centers for Disease Control (CDC):
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/index.html

World Health Organization:
https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public

MedStar E-Visits
Med Star E Visits

John Hopkins Medicine:

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/coronavirus

Mayo Clinic – Coronavirus:
https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/coronavirus/multimedia/img-20480021

Science Friday:
https://www.sciencefriday.com/episodes/march-13-2020/


WELL-BEING



Tips for Wellness During COVID-19

Listen to American University Professor Jody Gan’s Tips for Wellness

Metal Health resources Jody suggests can be found below:


Life at HomeResources from Mayor Bowser and DC Government to "make the best of working and living at home."



Article from the Huffington Post:


What therapists tell patients who are anxious about coronavirus Click here


The District of Columbia Network (DCN)
  provides an array of informative, exciting and award-winning programs focused on public affairs, current events and arts and entertainment. Click here for more information.




ALERTS & UPDATES

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recently expanded its list of possible symptoms of the virus to include: chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, and new loss of taste or smell.





Click here



Click here


Click here to visit the COVID-19 dashboard.  

DC Department of Insurance, Securities, and Banking Response to COVID Public Health Emergency.  
Click here for more information. You can view the updated DC Health Link summary chart for additional information. 




Self Assessment  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention expanded its list of possible symptoms of the virus to include: chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, and new loss of taste or smell.


Have you been in prolonged direct contact with someone diagnosed with COVID-19 OR 
have you traveled to a country the CDC identified as high-risk?
WAS I EXPOSED TO CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19)?  

Click here
for more information